bELLE vISTA mOTEL

 
 

BP station behind library on #...with Don Derry, Jim Baptie, Glen Baptie and Keith Woodcock

FISHER STOVES AND LATER GEM FAB 

Two manufacturing businesses owned and operated by Glenn Mawer at 5 Victoria Ave., Marmora

See more at 18 Forsyth Street

 

GAS STATION & DEALERSHIP

WEST OF THE MEMORIAL BUILDING (LIBRARY)

In 1954, the Marmora Herald reported the opening of a new garage west of the Memorial Building on #7 Highway,  accessible from #14 Highway too.  In fact it had already been the business of Harry Johnston,  but that year he formed a new partner- ship with Dell Killian and planned for renovations.

"The new garage is a commodious one and will enable the firm to take in 6 or 7 cars at a time for repairs or over hauling.  It is fitted with a hydraulic lift,  as well as a long pit for working under cars.  Two large entrance doors are in the north west part of the building and another large one facing #14 Highway will be available as the old garage building can be removed in the spring or early summer."

 

After   recently being used as a municipal garage,  it is now the home of the Century 21 Real estate office.

                                      TWO STORES AT THE NORTH END!

NORTH END STORE

pAT lAWRENCE AND DAUGHTER, gINA

Sue Cuddy writes:  The North End Store was started by Matthew and Annie Mc Garvey who handed it down to Wes and Olive Cuddy. They in turn sold to Rose McGarvey and she sold it to Al and Pat Lawrence. The Lawrences have the old store sign .

Kim Lawrence Barton:   My parents owned the store, the gas station was across the road and was owned by the hammocks. The store is now a house.

Annmarie Willman-Spry adds:   North End Variety ran in the 1960's - Grandma used to shop there.  Sheused to have us drive her up there to buy coldcuts and buns. Of course, she always had an ice cream cone. Jim Spry claims there was aToyota dealership across the road from North End Variety.

Peter Fudge writes:  Mom and dad ran North End Variety in the early 90's. Located at the intersection of McGill and Main st. Closed down in '93 due to someone running into the gas pumps and causing an explosion.

Leo Provost sorts things out: Some folk are getting the North End Store confused with Tom Smiths Texaco Service Station. The North End Store was originally owned by Matt McGarvey & his wife.  It ran for a number of years & then was operated by Olive,  who was the daughter of the McGarveys & her husband Wes Cuddy.   I believe the next owners were Al Lawrence & his wife.  It was always a grocery store but never a gas station I don't recall who owned it in its later years.

The Texaco Station was across the street. It was originally run by Billy Smith & his wife His son Tom & his wife Mae, had a bit of a convenience store along with the gas station. In the later years Tom built the building where the real estate office is now & did minor repairs, oil changes etc I think the next owners were John Gray & his wife Gladys.

Jackie Fraser   Tom helped my mom and dad out tremen- dously. Dad always spoke very highly of Tom.

Glenn Mawer:   About 60 years ago. Wess and Olive Cuddy owned the North End Store. I remember 5 loaves of bread for 1 dollar. Across the street was Smith's garage, and pumps and a small restaurant.

Dale Sopha:   Me and Bob used to ride our bikes there, full speed down the hill for the best ice cream cone you could get. Not soft serve either!

Patrici O'Brien:  Yup that's what we did too. They had ice cream and everything.  

Karen Paranuik: It was the best "ICE CREAM" in Marmora when I was a kid! 1968 and later.

 

Lisa Giroux-Belanger We used to walk down the street from my Grandmother's house - Marie Belanger- to get ice cream. I was very sad when it closed. Then it became a restaurant.

Lorrie Tannahill:  I remember being given $1 from my mom (and my friends got the same from theirs) and we would walk from what used to be Riverview Crescent (now Fox Lane maybe?) where my grandmother lived. We would walk to the store all excited about what we were going to buy... . and waving to every car that would pass by because back then everyone waved to everyone whether they knew you or not - I really do miss that actually. Tony and Judy Hammock owned it back then. Tony was so much fun in the store when he was there and Judy was always so patient with us waiting while we tried to figure out what to spend our $1 on. Back when life was simple.... Can we some how go back to those days???

Terry Brown Best place to go if you wanted to work on your car and very resonable charge. Those were the days.

 

AMELIA'S BEAUTY SALON - 48 Forsyth Street

Sharon Anne Vesterfelt:    Amelia's Beauty Salon from 1937 until Mom broke so many vertebrae in her back.   I took over in 1972 and the shop became Sharon's Beauty Salon.

PRINCE EDWARD ICE

 

NORTH END GAS & GOODIES

North End Gas and Goodies, located between McGill and Main Streets, is now a Remax Real estate office owned by Francesca Windover. In the photo below, the gas pumps were located in the bushes on the left. Prior to the real estate office, Francesca did run a restaurant and an art gallery in this location.

McGill Street on left behind house,  Main st. on right.

Sue Cuddy writes:  Laura and Will Smith owned the gas station across McGill Street . They handed it down to Tom and May Smith and May ran it for a number of years after Tom's death. Then John and Glady Gray took over and their daughter Judy Hammock helped out.

Kristin Philpot:  I worked there for a summer in high school in the nineties. It was called North End Gas and Goodies but we all called the North End Store. Must have stolen the name when the grocery store shut down!

I pumped gas, served ice cream,  and bred and packaged worms (bait). In hindsight, there probably wasn't enough hand washing in between! We had a sign outside that said "YES! We have gas and worms." - which led to a summer of ridicule and advice that I should see a doctor! We sold single cigarettes for $0.25, which meant a lot of guys stopping by for sneaky smokes their wives didn't know about! In those days they smoked indoors of course. We also had a cork board where cottagers or campers would leave messages for each other (imagine life without cells!). It was the way to find the best parties. It was a good job, the bosses pretty much left me to my own devices and I met lots of fun people....

 

GROCERY STORE ON CROWE LAKE

According to Wilma Bush, for a number of summers when Bud (Floyd) Loveless had the grocery store in town on Forsyth St.,  he also owned a grocery store on Marble Point Rd., just east of Tipperary House.   Carl Johnston ran the store. It was held in a small house which was once occupied by Percy & Grace Gray.

1937 PHILLIPS & DOYLE BUS

A new fine bus for the transportation of men to and from Deloro.  The body of the bus was constructed by Stanis Bertrand.

George Phillips and Joseph Doyle

WELLS BROTHERS LUMBER

 

The Marmora Feed Mill was originally built in October, 1927 by Charles Lummiss and William Bonter.  It was lined with metal to make it rat proof. In June of 1927,  the Herald wrote:

"Charles Lummiss and Robert E. Bonter have purchased the buildings of the old Ledger Gold Mine,  near Cordova.  After the buildings are taken down,  they will be brought to Marmora and used to erect a grist mill and feed store.  The grinding will be done by Hydro-Electric power."  
Note:  We have no references to the"Ledger Mine"  and wonder if this was meant to be "Ledyard" Mine.

Marmora Herald,  October 6, 1927

watercolour by Linda Sanderson Barber

Watercolour by Margaret Forde 1989

  By 1932 it was operated by veterinarian,  Dr. R.E. Lumsden. Later owned by Carl Heath,  it was taken over by Ed McNamara in Sept. of 1961 and again changed hands in 1974 by Murray Walker,  who ran it until 1981 when he sold it to Michael Kane. By 1984,  it had a new owner, Bob Mauer. 

The Feed Mill burned down in 1991 when Peter Beare was the owner.

marmor herald Sept 12, 1957

Memories:

Terry Bell :  I worked there part time cleaning grain,delivering freight for Pat McNamara.

Ronald Barrons :   In my childhood, this Mill was Marmora for me for the most part. My father would bring there grain, what ever the trunk would carry, to be chopped for feed, generally a couple or three times a month. We might go over to Neal and Naylor's for a look around or a pound of nails while we waited the milling. I still retain vision of that store. Hardware stores still remain one of my favourite places.
On our way home, we'd stop at Lynch's to pickup a selection of meat from the lockers, the coldest place in the world.   Carl Heath was the owner way back and I believe the miller was Harry (?)

Tom O'Neill :  There used to be a guy there named "grain bag " aka Ken Heath

 Randy Vilneff:  That silo just about killed me when it came down in the fire.

MEMORIES OF TERRION'S ESSO

After his hockey career as #7 for the Toronto Maple Leafs,  and #14 for the Los Angeles Kings,  it seemed only appropriate that Greg Terrion would return home and buy the gas station,  where he pumped gas as a kid,  at the intersection of highway #7 & #14.  (This was formerly Walker's garage and Ron Whiteman's garage.)    Paula Provost-Kelly added: "There was an ice cream building to the right and I worked there when I was 16."

Tony Bowen Some of the best memories of my life... Happy Times..Worked there from age 15-22...this picture must have been taken before noon as Ted fox's truck is there and at 12:01 each day he and Wilf Terrion would be at the Legion.

Jamie McCoy I remember when it was Whitemans and my dad had the auto shop attached to it. I used to wash windows when I was a kid.

Chris Stapley That was around the same time as I ran the Havelock Auto Parts store just down the street! Delivered thousands of dollars of goods to that building!

Bev Vani : My parents own the Sunoco station up the street good times!!
Pat McCrodan:  History lesson, this started out as Lavenders , then Jimmy Walker. Jim and Charlie Crawford kept the LCBO going then.                                                                                                                   Tony Bowen:  Wilf used to put cans of beer in that coke machine!                                                                       Bev Vani:  There was a ice cream place beside it                                                                                                  Annmarie Willman-Spry:   And across the street was originally the City Service owned by Uncle Arnold Walker.

THE DAIRY FREEZE AT THE ESSO STATION

Judy Primeau:  Before the coffee shop and Dixie Lee there was an ice cream place; the Dairy Freeze, owned by my father Cec Neal.  

Wayne Vanvolkenburg:  about the dairy freeze.  I believe that in 1962 it was operated by Cecil Neal.  At the serving window there was a platform with planks spaced about one-half inch apart (1.25 cm.).  While purchasing some ice cream, I dropped a coin which fell through one of the spaces.  This led us to believe that this had likely happened to other people as well.  Later that night we returned and managed to lift the deck and prop iton a garbage can and retrieve a good amount of change.  Unfortunately, we told others about this and it was never as lucrative in the future.

Melinda LaBossiere    "That was my grandparents restaurant."

The Country Kitchen

This building, on Highway 7 just west of the Village,  was built circa 1959, to be used as a building material store. However,  the store did not last long as such and soon became a restaurant operated by Marcel and Glenn Labossiere.

Joanne MacKenzie Thompson :  loved it here for Sunday breakfast

Memories of Aunger's store

Madoc Street...south side and a bit east of Victoria St.

Bob McKeown ahhh Pure Springs pop

Glenn Mawer Remember when George was on front street , about where the insurance office is now

Karen Paranuik It was on the street going to the dump across from a church. We stopped in for free stale candy on the way to school!

Memories of the Relm Club

Sharlene Callery: had a lot of great times there over the years...banquets, dances, weddings or just a great meal...sad to see it gone this past summer when we were up for Havelock Jamboree.

Terry Bell: Loved sitting in the restaurant kitchen chatting away with Russ Jarvis.

Wendy Cherry That's where we had our wedding reception in 1978!

Patti Shaughnessy Oh my, my mom (Norma Sopha)  worked there for many years. I used to babysit the owner's daughters.I ate a few meals there. Tried working there for a bit but I was a lousy server, I spent too much time socializing. I too have fond memories.

Barb Callfas Duff: Lots of memories of the Springbrook bowling banquet being held there...

Margriet Kitchen Our family attended several Timbertrail Western Riders banquets there. Great fun. Ralph and I used to occasionally stop for breakfast or just coffee. Really nice folks. 

Rose Watson My Wedding Reception was there 41 years ago!!    

Sue Mohr Wow that brings back memories , that's where I had my wedding reception 1978 ... 

Pat McCrodan If was the Heights to me, Russ made good Westerns    

 Glenn Mawer spent many school nites there, dancing to the jute box             

Marmora Flea Market run by Glen Mawer.  Later the flea market was run by Cathie Jones and Kristin Philpot

 

Jenny Bedore Hyland Used to also be called The Heights, as I recall.

Glenn Mawer High school kids went there after school . Russ had a juke box. It was a great place to hang out

 Annmarie Willman-Spry My brother Kelly Willman cooked there for a couple of years. He liked working there. My grandmother (Flossie Hinds) & her sisters Phoebe & Leona Walker a few times.

 Kent Jarvis Thanks for posting this picture, it brings back a lot of memories.

Richard Deering Took the bus from there to Toronto when I joined the OPP in 1970.

Doug Prindle   Club house with fries and turkey gravy... the best

Twyla-Mae Harris Silk My Aunt Lorna worked there for years

DWAYNE & BETTY WELCH AT THE IGA ,  Highway 7                                                              (Purchased from Dot & Vaughan Glover in 1971)

 

Ross Toms:   Dwayne was my hockey coach in Peterborough (Mark Street Church Juvenile Hockey team). Great guy !!!

Dorothy Caverly:   Great friend and he and Betty were wonderful community supporters! Miss them in Marmora

Lois Derry:  My first boss. Very nice person.

Glenn Mawer:  Great guy and a good friend

 

Back row l to r:  Betty Welch, Dwayne Welch, Gary Wilson (butcher) , John VanVolkenburg, Keith Fenton
front row l to r:  Ki Barnum, Lou Bedore, Grace Sheridan, Belle Goodchild, Ev Nicolson and Shirley Lummiss
 

Lucille Bedore

Grace Sheridan

Dwayne Welch with Doris Bedore Goodchild

John VanVolkenburg retires. (with Doris)  Party at Welch's, 1975

Dot and Vaughan Glover retire, 1971 Party at VanVolkenburg's 1971

 

Article - Aug30,  1978

THE BP CORNER -  Bursthall & #7 Highway                                           This property was,  at one time,   City Service owned by Arnold Walker - Murray's father,  according to A.Willman-Spry.